Search site

School of Geography

Karen Mullin Karen Mullin

Contact details


School of Geography
University of Leeds
University Road
Leeds LS2 9JT   UK

Email:
gy09kl

Telephone:

The spatio-temporal and social distribution of ecosystem services in the context of land use change

Project overview

The substantial change in land use across the UK due to population growth and urbanisation has had major environmental, social and economic consequences. One effect has been a change in the distribution of ecosystem services (the benefits humans derive from ecosystems). Ecosystem services are increasingly recognised as key factors in the well-being and health of humans, yet the social distribution of the services and whether or not change has been socially just is not well understood in the UK.

This research is a spatio-temporal analysis of the social distribution of ecosystem services in the UK. The aim is to understand the changes in the social distribution of ecosystem services and the implications for socially just maximisation of ecosystem services.

Aims/objectives

  • Understand how spatial distribution of ecosystem services has changed over time.
  • Understand how the social distribution of ecosystem services has changed over time.
  • Evaluate how the social distribution of ecosystem services has changed with respect to policy objectives of a) promoting health and well-being and reducing health inequalities b) social and environmental justice.
  • Examine land use pressures/spatial strategies in the UK and draw conclusions on the implications for social distribution of ESS in response to potential strategic land use plans.
  • Make policy and practice recommendations aimed at maximising welfare from ecosystem services for all.

Supervisors

Research affiliations

Funding

NERC DTP studentship

Short CV

2012 – 2014: Remote Sensing Team Manager, Network Mapping Aerial Surveys

2010 – 2012: Remote Sensing Technician, Network Mapping Aerial Surveys

2010: MSc GIS, University of Leeds

2006: BSc (Hons) Geography, University of Durham