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School of Geography

Archived news

  • Joseph Holden was live on BBC Radio York on Monday 28 November talking to Georgey Spanswick about the School’s new NERC-funded integrated catchment solutions programme.

  • Paul Kay and Richard Ansell's monitoring of flubendazole in moorland soils, originating from medicated grouse grit, was picked up by Raptor Persecution UK.

  • Paul Kay and Lee Brown's new paper in Environmental Pollution on pharmaceutical pollution in the River Aire and Calder was covered by the internet news site BuzzFeed.

  • Duncan Quincey, Scott Watson, and Owen King travelled to Manchester Science festival where they joined other researchers from across the UK to talk about glaciers in the Everest region of Nepal. The Royal Society invited the team to exhibit their work following a previous event at the Royal Society Summer Science Exhibition in London.

  • Pippa ChapmanRichard Grayson and Joseph Holden all appeared on Yorkshire Farming, BBC Radio York in a one hour special about their soil projects.

  • The EMBER project was discussed several times during a House of Commons debate on Monday 31 October, after the online petition 'Ban Driven Grouse Shooting' received more than 100,000 signatures.

  • Joseph Holden appeared on BBC Radio 4's Farming Today programme on Monday 18 July to discuss agriculture and water quality.

  • Andy Baird presented a paper on the hydrological dynamics of tropical peatlands at the 'Hydrogeology of Peat' meeting organised by The Geological Society and the British Hydrological Society and held at the University of Birmingham on 7 July. Dylan Young and Graeme Swindles are co-authors of the work.

  • Pippa Chapman appeared on BBC Radio York on Sunday with colleagues from the White Rose Sustainable Agriculture Consortium discussing our soils and nutrient research at the University farm.

  • James Bell presented an overview of his PhD research at ‘Darwin Day’ at the Paris Natural History Museum.
  • Duncan Quincey has been elected as Secretary of GAPHAZ (Glacier and Permafrost Hazards in Mountains), a Standing Group of IACS and IPA. GAPHAZ is the leading international scientific body focussing on mountain hazards and the primary adviser to international and national agencies, responsible authorities and private companies. Duncan will take the position of vice-chair in 2017, and will chair the group in 2018.

  • Megan Klaar recently attended the 11th International Symposium on Ecohydraulics in Melbourne, Australia, where she presented a paper entitled ‘Instream wood as a driver of nutrient attenuation in a lowland sandy stream’ and convened two sessions on ‘Vegetation and Fluvial Processes’.
     
  • A project in which Megan Klaar (Co-I) and colleagues at the University of Birmingham are collaborating on was recently selected by ESRC for an Evidence Briefing to Whitehall and Westminster policy makers to highlight the project’s key findings and policy implications. The ‘Summer After the Flood’ project explored the factors that enable or inhibit flood preparedness by businesses and communities as events unfolded in the aftermath of the 2013/14 winter floods. 
  • Frances Drake presented a paper titled ‘Belonging to Action: Fracking in the UK’ at the Sixth Annual Dimensions of Political Ecology Conference at University of Kentucky, Lexington in February.

  • The EMBER project received some press attention during the recent flooding crisis. George Monbiot linked to one of the project's hydrology papers in his article which was also published in the Guardian. The Financial Times then cited the full Ember project report in an article the next day.

  • Lee BrownMark Smith and Megan Klaar have been awarded a NERC Open CASE studentship to start in 2016, working with JBA consulting and the Yorkshire Dales Rivers Trust to study Woody debris effects on upland river hydromorphological processes.

  • Rizwan Nawaz and Adrian McDonald presented findings from the Abu Dhabi Water Budget Project during a series of meetings with the Environment Agency in the Emirate of Abu Dhabi during early December. They also met with representatives from the National Water Centre in the United Arab Emirates to discuss potential collaborative teaching and research opportunities. Rizwan delivered a talk about the Water & Development Initiative (WADI) to the Qatar General Electricity & Water Corporation in Doha.

  • The University of Leeds hosted TV weatherman Paul Hudson as he recorded an edition of the BBC Weather Show in the School of Earth and Environment. Paul spoke to a number of staff from across the faculty to demonstrate the breadth of the atmospheric/climate work going on here in Leeds. Duncan Quincey told of his exploits further afield in Greenland mapping out meltwater runoff using drones. The programme was broadcast across the five regional BBC radio stations.

  • Joseph Holden is co-convening a session on peatland hydrology at the EGU conference in Vienna, April 2016. 

  • Scott Watson and Owen King spent four weeks camping next to the Khumbu Glacier at 5000m for their first field campaign. Scott was working on the glacier surveying lakes (in an inflatable dinghy) and ice cliffs, whilst Owen was collecting dGPS control points to tie down multi-temporal digital elevation models. They were accompanied by Duncan Quincey and Ann Rowan for the first part of the trip. Some of the team’s observations were reported by the BBCThe Washington PostAtlas Obscura, and world-renowned mountaineer and photojournalist Jake Norton. Scott was also recently awarded expedition grants from the Mount Everest Foundation and Petzl Foundation to conduct further field research in 2016.

  • In December work being conducted by Megan Klaar and colleagues at the University of Birmingham was presented to the House of Commons.  Research conducted as part of an ESRC Urgency grant entitled The Summer After the Floods: a real-time examination of the social, economic and environmental dimensions of flood recovery and resilience which focuses on the Winter 2013/14 UK flood impacts was presented to a select group of MPs. In collaboration with colleagues in Business and Human Geography, Megan is leading the hydrological and environmental characterisation of the Winter 2013/14 flood event at four case study locations, with a particular focus on the integration and understanding of groundwater flooding in current government policies and public awareness.  More information on the project can be found here.

  • Lee Brown and Jeannie Beadle visited the RSPB headquarters in Sandy where they gave two talks about peatland pool ecosystems to an audience of lead scientists and reserve ecologists. They also briefly outlined some of the other peatland research projects that are ongoing in the research group.

  • Joseph Holden visited the Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries in Berlin as a member of their Scientific Advisory Board. A number of joint projects are being initiated with them including some on European low flows and peatland carbon characterization techniques.

  • Joseph Holden attended a UK Floods Restatement project meeting with 13 other experts in Oxford. A co-authored draft paper is undergoing final modification following the workshop.

  • Antony Blundell presented his talk Using palaeoecology to support blanket peatland management/ restoration to the Yorkshire Palaeoecology Group at York University.

  • International Center for Climate Governance Best Climate Practices competition puts a SoG-based entry (SUDS for FOOD) in the top 5 of 45 entries from around the world. Stefania Girardi who carried out the work in conjunction with Rizwan Nawaz, Gordon Mitchell and Viki Hirst whilst based in SoG will be presenting it at the Milan EXPO 2015.

  • Lee Brown is part of a new Rivers Stakeholders Group which is being convened by Natural England's freshwater group to provide feedback on various draft outputs on river priority habitat mapping, SSSI notification strategy, and general habitat conservation strategy.

  • Lee Brown gave an invited talk at the British Ecological Society's Aquatic Group annual meeting in London. The subject was 'Landscape-scale peatland restoration: assessing benefits for aquatic biota'.

  • Joseph Holden presented one of the Presidential Lectures at the British Science Festival on 7 September. His talk was titled 'Peatlands and Environmental Change'.

  • The EMBER project has appeared in several articles recently by The Guardian, Daily Record, New Scientist and in a blog by the Sustainable Restaurants Association.

  • On 25 August Joseph Holden appeared on BBC TV Look North, and several other regions, during a 5 minute news item about the latest paper from the EMBER project showing how prescribed burning impacts peatland hydrology. The story was also covered on 5 BBC local radio stations across the UK.

  • Rizwan Nawaz was an invited speaker at the UK Water Efficiency Network event "A Regional Approach to Water Efficiency" held at Glasgow Caledonia University on 28 April. He adapted and delivered the talk to a much younger audience during assembly for Key Stage 1 pupils at Talbot Primary School in Leeds. This was as part of the school's 'Living Responsibly' themed week.

  • Scott Watson was recently awarded a British Society for Geomorphology research grant and a geographical fieldwork grant from the Royal Geographical Society. These will support fieldwork on the Khumbu Glacier in Nepal later this year.

  • Mike Kirkby, Jonathan Carrivick, Mark Smith, Ed Turner, Brian Irvine and William James all gave presentations on various aspects of their work within the River Basins cluster at the European Geosciences Union General Assembly conference in Vienna, 12-17 April.

  • Rizwan Nawaz was a panellist at the UK-Gulf Research Forum meeting held at the Royal Society for Chemistry in London on 23 March. The meeting was organised by the British Council and Department for Business, Innovation & Skills with special guest British Ambassador to Kuwait. Its purpose was to identify joint UK and UAE/Kuwait research opportunities in areas of health, water and energy.

  • Joe Mallalieu, William James and Jonathan Carrivick have returned from a productive visit to the Greenland ice-sheet. They successfully retrieved data and instruments monitoring the ice-marginal dynamics of Russell Glacier since summer 2014.

  • Kathryn Smith’s PhD project on the impact of tracks on blanket peatlands was mentioned in the Moorland Association’s press release in response to the CCC report.

  • James Bell presented a poster entitled ‘Ecology of sedimented hydrothermal vents’ at the 14th Deep Sea Biology Symposium in Aveiro, Portugal.

  • James Bell has written a piece in Planet Earth, NERC's quarterly magazine, on the unique animals that live in the deep seabed.  The magazine is available here (opens external website) and the article starts on page 24.

  • Faith Chan was interviewed by China Daily about the flooding in Hong Kong and the resulting article was published on 30 May on their website (opens external website) under the headline The menace of gathering storms.

  • Oliver Fritsch (Co-I) has been awarded a two-year Leverhulme Trust International Network Grant on Integrated Water Resources Management as an Approach for Climate Change Adaptation: Comparative Lesson Drawing, total £125.000).

  • James Brasington (Queen Mary; PI), Duncan Quincey (Co-I), Simon Cook (MMU; Co-I) and Richard Williams (Aberystwyth, Co-I) have been awarded £64,500 by NERC to study the delivery and dispersal of landslide-derived sediment to the Dart River, New Zealand.

  • Carol White led an activity at Leeds Festival of Science (14 March–4 April) as part of the “Female Allstars” workshop. Her session involved using role-play and team-building activities to teach secondary school pupils about the physicist Lise Meitner (who discovered nuclear fission with Otto Hahn).

  • Carol White attended the 2014 Ocean Sciences Meeting in Honolulu, Hawaii, and presented the latest results from her seafloor microbial experiments.

  • Jonathan Carrivick, Duncan Quincey, Mark Smith and Daniel Carrivick have been awarded an INTERACT grant for travel and subsistence for a project that will laser scan in the Tarfala alpine valley, northern Sweden, for geomorphological characterisation and activity analysis.

  • Lee Brown and Graeme Swindles have been awarded a small grant from the EU funded INTERACT Arctic Transnational Access programme. This will pay for travel and accommodation to visit northern Sweden later this year to begin looking at the hydrological dynamics of pools across a chronosequence of decayed-intact permafrost and relate changes to testate amoebae communities, primary production and respiration.